Education

Primary School

DesignPrimary-age kids love to learn in a hands-on environment. Here are some of the thing to learn from TBot:

  • Math: basic number theory, angles and distances
  • Science: scientific method
  • Computer:program visually with blocks

High School

DesignHigh school are ready for more advanced concepts- like sensors and wireless communication:

  • Math: geometric shapes, algebra equations, calculus
  • Science experiments
  • Computer:c, multicore, wireless, sensors

University

DesignTBot is a flexible robot platform for advanced projects:

  • Control systems
  • Color theory
  • Swarm behavior
  • Embedded system
  • Parallel programming

Downloadable Content

“The Magic Robot”

By completing this activity, students should gain the knowledge and understanding of computer science concepts and programming experience required by the New Zealand Digital Technologies Achievement Standards of 2.45, 2.46, and parts of 2.44. It aims to deliver this knowledge to students through an engaging and entertaining experience.
This activity is basically another version of the popular activity ‘Card Flip Magic’ developed by Tim Bell and featured here. The interesting difference here is that we are going to have a robot performing the role of the magician. After randomly arranging the squares into a 6 by 6 matrix-like block, students would flip a particular square/card from their own choice. The robot then will walk over each square and find out the particular card that was flipped.
This activity guide assumes minimal prior knowledge of programming; hence it should be accessible to a wider range of teachers and used confidently to run this activity in their classes.

25 page PDF|Video

“Binary Number Representation in LED lights”

By completing this activity, students should gain the knowledge and understanding of computer science concepts and programming experience required by the New Zealand Digital Technologies Achievement Standards of 2.45, 2.46, and parts of 2.44. It aims to deliver this knowledge to students through an engaging and entertaining experience.
It also has the added benefit of exposing students to some basic concepts in electronics. Some achievement standards of electronics may in fact be covered by this activity. While students with electronics background will be in an advantageous position, background in electronics is not necessary as this guide provides all the details required to assemble the apparatus. If desired, students could have the apparatus preassembled. This activity consists of 2 phases with each phase building up on top of the previous one.
This activity guide assumes minimal prior knowledge of programming; hence it should be accessible to a wider range of teachers and used confidently to run this activity in their classes.

19 page PDF|Video